Chapter 1, Installment 3 – 11/04/12

Chaper 1, Installment 2 - Oct 19, 2012

Remarks:

  • If you’ll recall from the previous installment, 5 low-yield “Class 9” warheads (projectiles) were fired at the Miasan cruiser in an effort to merely disable its engines. However, instead of merely becoming disabled, the cruiser exploded, much to the bewilderment of the crew.
  • Ah, exploding consoles on the bridge. A feature of almost every science fiction show. It adds some action and thrill to what would otherwise be a very dull environment on a ship’s bridge, but the consoles on board the Vice Admiral’s ship don’t always spark and fizzle. The initial hits from the three Miasan cruisers weren’t able to do much to the ship, but the Miasan dreadnought’s weapons are far more powerful. Normally, measures exist to counteract energy surges on a ship caused by weapon hits, but if a ship is unprepared, those measures may not be so effective. While fighting the three initial Miasan cruisers, most shield power was diverted to fore shields, which meant that the rear shields were relatively vulnerable.
  • Launching every single flight wing seems like a drastic tactic so early on in a combat situation. But as we’ll see, there is a reason for this. The Vice Admiral’s greatest advantage in this scenario is that Flight Wings can act independently of the escort carrier for an extended period of time, and can help keep other targets occupied, letting the main ship focus on its primary objective.
  • The ship’s Long-Range Sensors (LRS) are somehow being jammed by the enemy ships, which is why they’re only able to see small shadows on Short-Range Sensors (SRS) of approaching ships that are within SRS detection range. The Miasans are attempting to exploit this by sneaking in Mining Vessels past the blockade – the reason for which will be explained soon.
  • Not being able to fire on civilian ships doesn’t mean that illegally-operated ships can’t be subjected to arrest or boarding by investigators, and so on. Intergalactic law is complicated, and needs a little more time in order to be explained.

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